Angebote zu "Chronology" (8 Treffer)

Yes Indeed! (2-Cd) Soul Chronology Vol.4
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(2013/History Of Soul) 56 Tracks 1957-58 mit 30-seitigem Booklet.Als schwarze populäre Musikgenres wurden von weißen Teenagern übernommen.Publikum in den 1950er Jahren, gab es eine Tendenz für schwarze Musik zuauf authentischere, einfa

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Stand: 04.07.2018
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Save A Seat For Me (2-Cd) Soul Chronology Vol.3
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(2013/History Of Soul) 56 Tracks 1955-57 mit 30 Seiten Booklet.

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Yes Indeed (A Soul Chronology Volum
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Yes Indeed (A Soul Chronology Volum: Various

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Stand: 19.07.2018
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Various - Yes Indeed! (2-CD) Soul Chronology Vol.4
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(2013/History Of Soul) 56 Tracks 1957-58 mit 30-seitigem Booklet. Als schwarze populäre Musikgenres wurden von weißen Teenagern übernommen.Publikum in den 1950er Jahren, gab es eine Tendenz für schwarze Musik zuauf authentischere, einfachere Stile zurückgreifen. Gegen Ende dieses ProzessesJahrzehnt suchte eine neue Generation von schwarzen Unternehmern nach einer Lösung.durch den Aufbau von innovativen Independent-Labels, die dieeinige der bekanntesten Namen des zwanzigsten Jahrhunderts zu produzieren.Jahrhunderts wie Sam Cooke, Berry Gordy und Ray Charles.Die wachsende Bürgerrechtsbewegung, der Anstieg des 45rpm-Rekordsund die E-Gitarre spielten alle ihre Rolle bei der Schaffung eines neuenTon. Teil der History of Soul-Serie, die dazugehörige 32-seitigeBooklet skizziert den historischen Hintergrund einer Sammlung vonspannende Tracks aus den 1950er und 60er Jahren.

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Various - Save A Seat For Me (2-CD) Soul Chrono...
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(2013/History Of Soul) 56 Tracks 1955-57 mit 30 Seiten Booklet.

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Chronology of Love , Hörbuch, Digital, 1, 202min
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Keat Wade is a Master Gardener of a different kind. His tools are words and expressions; his soul (and the souls of his readers) is the soil he cultivates... Chronology of Love: Times and Season is Keat´s masterpiece garden. Chronology of Love is more than a book of poems to understand. Chronology of Love is a place where your soul and your senses can experience the goodness and fullness of the Lord God - creation´s Master Gardener. The Spirit of God will touch you as you make your way through this audiobook. He has breathed life into Keat´s garden. Rather than rush your way through each chapter, let the Spirit breathe into you, poem by poem. 1. Language: English. Narrator: Keat Wade. Audio sample: http://samples.audible.de/bk/acx0/013132/bk_acx0_013132_sample.mp3. Digital audiobook in aax.

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Various - Does Anybody Know I´m Here? (CD)
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(2005/KENT) 24 tracks - Vietnam through the eyes of black America 1962-1972 (2005/KENT) 24 tracks - Vietnam through the eyes of black America 1962-1972 THE SOUNDTRACK This second volume of Vietnam War-related soul music is presented with an eye to the chronology of the war. Not all of the tracks mention Vietnam by name. but it will fairly obvious to the listener that when, say, Joe Tex sings ´when Johnny comes marching home again. I can´t see you no more´ his hero is not -marching home´ from the nearest Piggly Wiggly, or that when Caldin Gill of the Velvelettes sends her message of fidelity to a lover who´s ´gone to a faraway land´, the lover in question is probably on his way to somewhere that´s a bit more dangerous than Belgium. Even without a direct mention of the ´V´ word, there can be no doubt that Vietnam is at the head of all of the music that this CD contains... ...Well. nearly all of it. anyway. Our opening track actually predates America´s full-on involvement in a war with Vietnam. although the US military was already fully involved in Vietnam´s own civil war when a young Marvin Gaye recorded his ´Soldier´s Plea´ in early 1962. Like other recordings of the period that espoused similar sentiments such as Dee Clark´s ´I´m A Soldier Boy´, ´Soldier´s Plea´ is representative of its era, and of the patriotic stance that records of its kind tended to take in the days before the horrors of war put an altogether different perspective on things. Less than a decade later and based partly on his brother Frankie´s experiences as a serving soldier. Gaye delivered ´What´s Going On´, his long-playing masterwork that succinctly summed up black America´s overall disillusionment with its lot after Jam, message in most of the music was ´I´m proud of you´. rather than the bitterly expressed ´I should be proud´ that is at the heart of Martha Reeves´ stark tale of bad news from the start of the following decade. But in 1965, it was far more common to hear soul records that contained the kind of sentiments expressed in former Pilgrim Traveler. and manager/confidante of the late Sam Cooke. J W Alexander´s ´Keep A Light In The Window Until I Come Home´ than in West Coast bluesman King Solomon´s somewhat more concerned (and decidedly less enthusiastic) `Please Mr President´. If the feelings of those left behind at the time are having lived through half a decade or more of conflict. Like his brothers and sisters. he had come a long way in a short time. By the middle of the decade. and with the conflict well and truly underway, black America´s involvement in the war had increased significantly. thanks to changes in US induction policy that made it virtually impossible for poorly-educated Americans of any colour to avoid call-up With increased participation came increased musical involvement —although at this still-relatively-early stage in the proceedings. the innocently captured by the Velvelettes (´if a pretty girl should pass you by. I won´t mind if you give her the eye...[but] remember that your heart belongs to me´) and also with somewhat more desperation by Stax´s sweet soul trio the Charmers (-please. Uncle Sam, send back my man´), those of the enlisted are fully represented by two men here, who both served in the US military during the 60s. albeit not in Vietnam, and who — although not related — share a surname. William Bell received his ´greetings´ from Uncle Sam in 1964. and recorded his obviously heartfelt ´Soldier´s Goodbye´ around the time of his call-up. A couple of years later Houston-born Archie Bell adapted the Monitors´ 1966 recording of the Valadiers´ 1961 Motown hit ´Greetings This Is Uncle Sam)´ for an even more desperate ´A Soldier´s Prayer 1967´. Happily for both men. their tours of duty did not take them anywhere near the Ho Chi Minh Trail. but the war had a temporarily adverse effect on the chosen career of each. William Bell — Stax´s premier solo male vocalist at the time of his

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Various - She-Boom, She-Boom - African-American...
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(2000/Westside) 18 tracks booklet. African-American Influences On Reggae 1963-73 She-Boon She-Boom ´The Big Beat Keeps You Rocking On Your Feet´... ...And it came to pass that the American Rhythm & Blues of the 1950s and early 1960s begat reggae. Well, almost . Before Jamaica´s national music - and its most outstanding world export - became ´reggae´, it inevitably passed through several stages of metamorphosis. First there was the shuffle. the island´s own individualistic representation of the sounds that beamed daily and nightly from clear-channel R&B stations in America´s deep south - stations that could be heard the length and breadth of Jamaica when good weather conditions prevailed - and over massive sound systems at blues dances island-wide. The whole Ja. music industry that we know today stems from the shuffle, which was initially created to satiate demand for this style after the American R&B scene had moved on and away from it. Eventually the shuffle evolved into Ska, itself still influenced to a degree by the pre-Soul music of Black America. And as US R&B ultimately moved to the backburner to let Soul take over in the mid 60s, so Ska gave way first to soul-influenced rock steady and, eventually, to reggae - but those R&B influences never totally left Jamaican music. as you´re about to find out if you´ve bought this compact disc... To complement its two volumes of reggae versions of soul originals. ´The Music Got Soul´ (WESA 847) and ´The Music Got Mo´ Soul´ (WESA 848), Westside´s compilers-that-be now present a dozen and a half tracks which all have their musical origins in the aforementioned pre-Soul era but which successfully adapted to a Jamaican treatment. Presented in a chronology approximate to their original release date (these versions. not the US originals), they show how important American R&B was to the evolution of what we now know as reggae. Few would dispute this writer´s assertion that you couldn´t have had one without the other... Several of the acts featured herein actually started their careers in this pre-Soul era. Thus it´s entirely appropriate that the oldest song to feature. Joan Whitney and Alex Kramer´s ´Ain´t Nobody Here But Us Chickens´ -originally recorded by, and a # 1 R&B, # 6 Pop hit for, the great Louis Jordan in early 1947 - should be performed by the one of the first Jamaican artists to record locally. Lascelles Perkins made his debut recordings in the mid 1950s for Clement ´Coxsone´ Dodd. 20 years before his amusing version of ´Chickens´ (complete with speeded-up, Chipmunk like backing vocals by ´The Chicks´) hit the racks in mid-1974. An old-fashioned crooner with a distinct Nat ´King´ Cole influence. Perkins had been only semi-active as a recording artist for some years prior to this recording - but was still singing in the early 80s. when he cut a version of another Whitney/Kramer song much beloved by Jamaican singers. ´No Man Is An Island´. for his brother-in-law Dodd´s Studio One imprint. Another of those who was ´there at the start´ was Derrick Harriott, and it´s Derrick who provides us with the earliest recording on this CD. A more than capable tenor with a distinctive, melodic falsetto, Harriott had not long departed his colleagues in the Jiving Juniors to begin a lengthy career as a solo when he cut his own. slow-soul version of Donnie Elbert´s ´What Can I Do´ (De Luxe. 1958). The song had been a big ´end-of-night´ closer for sound systems for years. Derrick interspersed the verses of ´What Can I Do´ with a recitation that he had borrowed from ´All I Could Do Was Cry Part Two´. an early. torrid performance by future soul star Joe Tex (Anna Records 1959). To round the whole thing out he also threw in a snippet of Wilson Pickett´s then-current. breakthrough hit ´It´s Too Late´ (Double L. 1963) and the mixture came out perfectly, as you´ll hear here. Harriott did not confine his interest in Elbert´s catalogue to ´What Can I Do´ - he cut the man´s uptempo jiver ´Leona´ as the flip of ´The Wedding´ - nor his interest in medleys to this record. In 1969, just as rock steady was turning into reggae, he blended the choruses of the Pastels´ Been So Long´ (Hull. 1957) with the verses of the Tams´ 1964 ABC-Paramount recording of ´You Lied To Your Daddy´ to forge the churning. exciting version featured here. All in all. Harriott recorded more than a dozen Tams tunes, among them ´Standing In´, ´Laugh It Off´. ´Close To Mn´, ´Do I Worry´. ´Walk The Streets (a.k.a ´You Might As

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